Health Travel

(636) 465-6621

Call or Schedule a FREE online consultation

Hip

Total Hip Replacement

This surgery replaces diseased and damaged portions of the hip with implants designed to restore function to the hip joint.

After the femur (thigh bone) is separated from the hip socket, the damaged ball is removed, and damaged cartilage and bone are removed from the hip socket. A metal shell is pressed into the hip socket, which may be held in place with bone cement or screws.

Then, a plastic liner is locked into the metal shell and the artificial socket is complete. The surgeon now focuses on the femur implant. First, the end of the femur is hollowed out.

The metal implant is placed into the top of the thighbone. Bone cement may be used. A metal ball or ceramic ball component is attached to the stem. When the new ball socket components are joined to form the new hip joint, the procedure is complete.

Total Hip Resurfacing

This surgery replaces diseased and damaged portions of the hip with implants designed to restore function to the hip joint.

After the femur (thigh bone) is separated from the hip socket, the damaged area is removed, and the ball area is reshaped to fit the femur implant. To prepare the hip socket, the damaged cartilage and bone are removed.

A shell is implanted by pressing the metal shell into the socket of the hipbone. The shell is either held in place with bone cement or screws. A metal component is then attached to the reshaped femur, and finally, the new ball and socket components are joined to form the new hip joint.

Internal Screw Fixation for Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis (SCFE)

This surgical procedure is used to stabilize a femoral head that has slipped off the neck of the femur. One or more screws are inserted through the neck and into the femoral head.

To prepare for surgery the patient is positioned so that the hip is clearly visible to the physician with the area being cleaned and sterilized. An incision is made on the side of the thigh to allow access to the head of the femur.

In order to stabilize the femoral head, the surgeon inserts one or more screws through the neck of the femur and into the femoral head. This anchors the head, securing it to the neck and preventing further slipping. Once the procedure is done, the incision is closed and bandaged. The patient will be required to use crutches for at least six weeks after the procedure to allow the femur to heal.